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American Literature

Sports, Narrative, and Nation in the Fiction of F. Scott by Jarom McDonald

By Jarom McDonald

This examine examines the ways in which F. Scott Fitzgerald portrayed prepared spectator activities as operating to assist constitution ideologies of sophistication, group, and nationhood. Situating the examine within the panorama of past due nineteenth/early twentieth-century American activity tradition, bankruptcy One indicates how narratives of attending ballgames, studying or hearing activities media, and being a ‘fan,’ domesticate groups of spectatorship. Adopting this related framework, the subsequent 3 chapters discover how Fitzgerald’s literary representations of game tradition exhibit the complexities of yankee society. bankruptcy in particular considers the ‘intense and dramatic spectacle’ of faculty soccer in ‘This facet of Paradise’ as a method of exploring hyperlinks among spectatorship, emulation and beliefs. bankruptcy 3 maintains with university soccer as its subject, yet this time appears to be like at the way it is portrayed in Fitzgerald’s brief tales, so as to scrutinize the connection among the performative elements of activity and the performative points of social classification. eventually, bankruptcy 4 scrutinizes how the good Gatsby evaluations the romantic nationalist ideology of ‘America’s video game’ through revealing the category divisions and tensions of baseball’s spectator tradition.

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Sports, Narrative, and Nation in the Fiction of F. Scott Fitzgerald (Studies in Major Literary Authors)

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Extra resources for Sports, Narrative, and Nation in the Fiction of F. Scott Fitzgerald (Studies in Major Literary Authors)

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Klein, in his history of Dominican baseball entitled Sugarball, notes that Dominicans perceive success in baseball as signing a contract with one of these academies, because of the symbolic economic significance that a contract provides. He then writes, The dangers inherent in the dream of escaping poverty through sport are manifest throughout the third world, but they are especially so in the Dominican Republic because many people know someone well who has “succeeded” in baseball. (59) As Klein argues, this sense of perception of what constitutes success creates an illusion where the 1300 or so Dominicans earning a life through American baseball (roughly 50 as major league players, others at various minor league levels or in different staff or club positions) seem to be an enormous critical mass, and a newly signed contract seems a pipeline into that system.

This internalization of the minute details of a celebrity’s life creates an illusion that the fan knows the celebrity on a deeply personal level because of the level of detail involved in the retelling of certain anecdotes that are, for most people, kept private. For Schickel, the cult of celebrity thus bases its strength in the star figures becoming “intimate strangers” to the community of adoring fans. Of course, in some ways this point of analysis is ironic in that when fans treat celebrities as close friends, they create the fantasy of getting closer to their idols but at the same time create a level of worship that places the celebrities even higher upon a social pedestal.

In doing so, Fitzgerald would reach the conclusion that Princeton was a place “that preserves so much of what is fair, gracious, charming, and honorable in American life” (103). Yet in the same essay, Fitzgerald also notes that, at Princeton, [f ]ootball became, back in the nineties, a sort of symbol. Symbol of what? Of the eternal violence of American life? Of the eternal immaturity of the race? The failure of a culture within the walls? Who knows? It became . . the most intense and dramatic spectacle since the Olympic games.

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