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Colonizing Agriculture: The Myth of Punjab Exceptionalism by Mridula Mukherjee

By Mridula Mukherjee

During this learn of the agrarian economic climate of Punjab in India's colonial interval, the writer takes the commercial points of the lives of Punjab's peasants as a place to begin for figuring out the politics of this workforce from the Twenties to 1947. A comparability is made among Punjab and different areas of colonial India, particularly japanese India.

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Extra info for Colonizing Agriculture: The Myth of Punjab Exceptionalism (Sage Series in Modern Indian History, 9)

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31 29 30 31 Census of India, 1931, Vol. VII, Part II, p. 160, Table X. The Tribune, 6 October 1935. LRCR, pp. 52, 142–43. 22 Colonializing Agriculture The political value of the new system was, however, immense. In the words of the Report of the Land Revenue Committee:32 “Psychologically, the present system has the great advantage of always appearing to operate by way of remission, though actually it enables the demand to be pitched higher than would otherwise be possible. ” All adjustments in revenue rates were termed “remissions” and every such occasion gave the opportunity for display of government concern for the cultivators.

08 Col. 31 Col. 06 Col. 98 Col. 4A Col. 4B Col. 06 Col. 12 Col. 1B 1930–31 Montgomery District: Holding A Lyallpur District: Holding A Holding B Holding C (Govt. Farm of 700 acres) Jhelum District: Holding A Holding B Holding C Holding D Rohtak District: Holding A Holding B Holding C Holding D Multan District: Holding A Holding B Holding C Col. 97 Col. 29 Col. 06 Col. 26 Col. 83 Col. 93 Col. 10 Col. 4A Col. 4B Col. 4C 1928–29 1930–31 1937–38 Peasants as Tax-Payers 9 Col. 2A 1928–29 Col. 2B 1930–31 Col.

48. Quoted in Brij Narain, India Before and Since the Crisis, Vol. 2, p. 607. 34 Mridula Mukherjee, Peasants in India’s Non-Violent Revolution, Chapter 4, Section I. 35 Government Review of the Report of the Abiana Committee, 1934, paragraphs 17 and 18, quoted in Darling Papers, I/20, TS Notebook. Also see Imran Ali, The Punjab under Imperialism, pp. 159–69. 36 Darling Papers, I/20, TS Notebook. 37 Brij Narain, India Before and Since the Crisis, Vol. 2, p. 586. 33 Peasants as Tax-Payers 23 rate was even more inelastic than land revenue because government was under no obligation to reduce it, no matter how low the prices.

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