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Caesar Augustus: Seven Aspects by Millar F., Segal E. (ed.)

By Millar F., Segal E. (ed.)

Caesar Augustus This e-book provides seven clean and unique perspectives of Caesar Augustus by way of a global staff of students. The papers gathered right here examine the picture which he provided of himself, how historians and poets reacted to him, the character of his rule, and the illustration of the newly-established monarch between his topics within the provinces.

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1. Attacks echoed in Suet. Aug. 2. 3. Fr. 3 = Suet. Aug. 2. 3. Fr. 4 = Tert. De anim. 46; cf. Suet. Aug. 94. 9; Plut. Cic. 44. 2. Reliance on dreams and superstitions should not appear strange where Augustus is concerned. See below, n. 15. Fr. 9 = Plut. Cic. 45. 1. Fr. 10 = Plut. Brut. 27. 1. e. g. Tac. Ann. I. 10; Suet. Aug. 13 Fr. 11 = Suet. Aug. 27. 4. According to Appian, Quintus Gallius asked for the command in Africa, but plotted against Octavian; in consequence he was stripped of his praetorship, the enraged people tore his house down, and the Senate condemned him to death.

94. 9; Plut. Cic. 44. 2. Reliance on dreams and superstitions should not appear strange where Augustus is concerned. See below, n. 15. Fr. 9 = Plut. Cic. 45. 1. Fr. 10 = Plut. Brut. 27. 1. e. g. Tac. Ann. I. 10; Suet. Aug. 13 Fr. 11 = Suet. Aug. 27. 4. According to Appian, Quintus Gallius asked for the command in Africa, but plotted against Octavian; in consequence he was stripped of his praetorship, the enraged people tore his house down, and the Senate condemned him to death. Octavian however tried to spare his life.

1 The reference appears quite casually in a list of holders of priesthoods; but the very casualness of the allusion has a lot to tell us about how people in a Greek city saw the world in the 20s BC. Sebastos was of course to be the established Greek equivalent for Augustus and was to reappear on thousands of inscriptions throughout the imperial period. But when this statue was erected it was only one or two years since the name Augustus, never before used for a personal name, had been thought up in Rome, and solemnly voted by Senate and People in 27; voted, that is, as the new additional name of the thirty-five-year-old victor of the civil wars, 'Imperator Caesar divi filius', whom we call Octavian.

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